Matters handled by the Civil Enforcement Section include:

Alcoholic Beverage Control

The Section prosecutes violations of the District’s alcoholic beverage control laws before the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board. The Board may fine, and suspend or revoke the alcoholic beverage licenses of licensees that are the subject of the Section’s prosecutions.

Complaints about alcoholic beverage licensed establishments may be made to the Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration at the hotline at 202-329-6347.

Civil Forfeiture

The Section litigates forfeiture actions in D.C. Superior Court against property seized by the Metropolitan Police Department that is involved in certain criminal offenses. Seized property, such as vehicles and U.S. currency, may be subject to civil forfeiture if property was involved in the offenses of illegal firearms possession, illegal drug transactions, prostitution, gambling, illegal dumping, counterfeiting, and driving with a false temporary vehicle tag.

Persons with an interest in property that is subject to civil forfeiture may contact the District’s Metropolitan Police Department’s Evidence Control Branch at (202) 727-3230.

Education Licensure Enforcement

The Section defends decisions of the Office of the State Superintendent of Education to reject applications for new educational institutions before the District’s Education Licensure Commission. The Section also prosecutes license holders before the Commission to suspend or revoke education licenses for regulatory violations.

Financial Regulation

On behalf of the Commissioner of the Department of Insurance, Securities and Banking (DISB), the Section institutes liquidation or rehabilitation proceedings in D.C. Superior Court seeking to liquidate or rehabilitate insurance companies who are undercapitalized and thus unable to conduct business in the District. The Section also represents DISB in other financial actions, such as actions to enforce the Commissioner’s orders in securities matters.

Health Professional Discipline

The Section prosecutes licensed health professionals for violations of the Health Occupations Revision Act (HORA). Enforcement actions to fine health professionals or suspend or revoke their licenses are held before their respective licensing boards.

Complaints about health professionals licensed to practice in the District of Columbia may be made to the D.C. Department of Health at (202) 442-5955.

Human Rights Violations

On behalf of the District, the Section institutes legal action based on claims for unlawful discrimination filed at the Office of Human Rights (OHR) alleging Human Rights Act housing violations. Claimants who obtain a probable cause finding from OHR may elect to have their cases heard before the Commission on Human Rights or in D.C. Superior Court. The Section brings enforcement actions in D.C. Superior Court when claimants select that forum.

Complaints about human rights violation may be made to the D.C. Office of Human Rights at (202) 727-4559.

Local Business Certification

Small and local businesses in the District obtain certification from the D.C. Department of Small and Local Business Development (DSLDB) to help them compete in District government procurement contracting. The Section represents the District in enforcement actions to suspend or revoke a business certification for violation of the laws regulating certification. The Section also defends the decision of the DSLDB Director to deny certification.

Medical Recovery

Where the District pays the healthcare costs of indigent persons who later obtain a financial recovery due to the injuries sustained, the District may be entitled to recover its Medicaid funds. The Section takes action on behalf of the District in D.C. Superior Court, in probate proceedings or against third parties, if necessary, to recover Medicaid costs. The Section also seeks to recover healthcare funds expended on behalf of the District’s injured employees, including police officers, by taking legal action against third party tortfeasors where appropriate.

Complaints about the failure of employers to pay wages can be made to the D.C. Department of Employment Services at (202) 727-7000.

Workers Compensation Recovery

The Section seeks to recover lost wages suffered by District employees due to injuries caused by third parties. The Section does this by instituting enforcement actions in D.C. Superior Court if necessary.

The Office of the Attorney General for the District of Columbia (OAG) is one of two prosecutorial entities in the District, the other being the United States Attorney’s Office. The Criminal Section of the Public Safety Division (PSD) of OAG prosecutes adults who commit certain criminal offenses within the District. Specifically, the Criminal Section prosecutes five primary categories of criminal offenses:

Criminal Traffic Offenses

  • Impaired Driving Offenses
  • Reckless Driving, Speed in Excess of 30 mph over the Posted Limit
  • Leaving After Colliding
  • Operating After Suspension
  • No Permit

Certain Weapons Offenses

  • Unregistered Firearms
  • Unlawful Possession of Ammunition
  • Possession of a BB Gun
  • Possession of Illegal Self Defense Spray
  • Possession of a Destructive Device.

Quality of Life Offenses

  • Possession of an Open Container of Alcohol
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Indecent Exposure
  • Metro Misconduct offenses
  • False Report to the Police
  • Fishing Without a License
  • Drinking in Public

DC Municipal Regulation Offenses

  • Unleashed Dogs
  • Counterfeit Vehicle Tags
  • Vending Violations

Certain Fraud Against the District Offenses

  • Tax Fraud
  • Welfare Fraud

Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor’s Blog

Useful Links

Traffic Safety Links

Impaired Driving Prevention Links

Law Enforcement Links

Firearm Safety and Registration Links

Other Useful Links

February 6, 2017

B22-008: Campaign Finance Transparency and Accountability Amendment Act of 2017

Office of the Attorney General (OAG) attended hundreds of community meetings over the last two years and a constant concern heard from residents was the need for a transparent, ethical, and fair government. In particular, residents were concerned with the perception that large campaign contributions can affect the outcome of government decisions and awards. The residents of the District of Columbia have charged OAG with promoting the public interest. With that mandate, and after a close examination of current laws, court decisions, and strong Council proposals, Attorney General Karl A. Racine introduced Bill 22-008 to strengthen three major pillars of the District’s campaign-finance law: 1) ending pay-to-play politics; 2) making political donations transparent, and 3) creating a “bright line” between candidates and PACs. The proposal also includes other provisions that tighten the District’s campaign-finance laws. Bill 22-008 was introduced on January 5, 2017, and jointly-referred to the Committee of the Whole and the Committee on the Judiciary.

Ending the Appearance of Pay-to-Play Politics

  • “Pay-to-play politics” is a term that many D.C. political observers have used lately. It means that, when you donate to a politician, you get something of value in return.
  • Under current law, donors to D.C. political campaigns can receive major financial benefits from the District government.
  • This campaign-finance bill addresses this problem by saying if someone, including a corporation, donates to a campaign or a PAC, they cannot engage in any major business with the District for two years, including:
    • Large business contracts;
    • Major grants; and
    • Significant tax breaks.

Making Political Donations Transparent

  • The Supreme Court has said that the government can’t limit someone’s independent expenditures (in other words, spending to support or oppose a candidate without actually working with a campaign).
  • But government can put important disclosure requirements on this kind of spending to make sure the public knows where the money is coming from.
  • Under current law, anonymous donors are able to give unlimited amounts of money to an organization in order to make independent expenditures, as long as that organization doesn’t have electioneering as its principal purpose. So anyone could set up an entity and skirt our disclosure laws.
  • The legislation addresses this problem by making sure that all organizations making independent expenditures, not just primarily political ones, have to disclose their donors

Creating a “Bright Line” Between Candidates and PACs

  • The Supreme Court’s rulings make clear that, as long as someone is working with a campaign, their spending can be subjected to sensible regulations, like dollar limits
  • Under current law, there is a lot of activity that individuals, corporations, and PACs can engage in that isn’t regulated – even though they are actually working with a campaign.
  • The proposal would ensure that when someone works with a campaign, they are subject to all the regulations that help keep our elections clean and transparent.

Other Provisions

  • The bill would also ensure that members of boards and commissions appointed by District government officials go through the same rigorous ethics training that District government employees undergo.

Pre-Proposal Conference PowerPoint

DC - 2000 Employment Application

Ethnic/Race Self-Identification

Please complete this information to assist us in complying with equal opportunity record keeping and reporting requirements. Completion of this information is strictly voluntary, refusal to provide the information will not result in any adverse treatment. This information will be kept in a separate, confidential file and will only be used for reporting purposes consistent with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s guidelines.

The Dangers of Synthetic Drugs

Synthetic drugs, specifically synthetic cannabinoids, are a mixture of herbs, incense, and/or spices that are sprayed with mind-altering chemicals. Learn more about these drugs, their dangers, and what you can do if you need help.

The District of Columbia’s recent legalization of less than two ounces of marijuana for persons over 21 years of age or older, and decriminalization of less than one ounce for people of any age, has no impact on the District’s existing impaired driving laws.  In the District, it remains illegal to operate or to be in physical control of any vehicle while intoxicated or while under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or a combination of the two.  See DC Code §50-2206.11.  A drug is defined as any chemical substance that affects the processes of the mind or body, including but not limited to a controlled substance, and any prescription or non-prescription medication.  See DC Code §50-2206.01 (6).  One is under the influence of a drug when one’s ability to operate a motor vehicle is impaired in way that can be perceived or noticed.  SeeCriminal Jury Instruction for the District of Columbia 6.400.  Simply put, you cannot drive under the influence.  That remains true for alcohol, and it holds true for marijuana. 

Although possession of certain quantities of marijuana has been legalized or decriminalized, it is illegal to smoke or otherwise consume marijuana in a public space or in a vehicle.  The Office of the Attorney General prosecutes public consumption violations and DUIs.

While decades of research have brought the dangers of alcohol impaired driving to light, it has only been in more recent years that drug impaired driving has been studied.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recently reported that although alcohol impaired driving has declined over the years, marijuana and other drug impaired driving has increased.  Marijuana, like any drug, can be impairing.  Police officers remain vigilant in their efforts to detect impaired drivers and keep the District’s roads safe. 

Use this printable log book to track your hours and wages.

El código de D.C. desde § 42-3101 hasta §42-3111 le permite a la Oficina del Fiscal General y a los grupos comunitarios entablar demandas contra propiedades que están siendo usadas para vender, almacenar o fabricar drogas ilegales; que están siendo usadas para almacenar o vender armas de fuego de forma ilegal; o que están siendo usadas para facilitar la prostitución. Estas demandas también deben mostrar que las propiedades tienen un “efecto adverso” en el vecindario como resultado de la actividad relacionada con drogas, armas o prostitución. La ley faculta a los jueces en esas demandas a remediar la molestia a través de una variedad de medios, como ordenarle a un arrendador desalojar a un inquilino problemático, instalar cámaras de seguridad, mantener una lista de personas a las que no se les permite ingresar en la propiedad o dar otros pasos para evitar la actividad molesta.

1. ¿Cuándo se aplica este estatuto?

Para que se pueda aplicar este estatuto, el demandante debe poder demostrar que una de tres cosas está sucediendo en una propiedad:

  • Fabricación o venta de drogas ilegales,
  • Almacenamiento de armas de fuego ilegales o
  • Prostitución.

AVISO: Cuando la Oficina del Fiscal General entabla una demanda bajo este estatuto, la corte generalmente espera ver evidencia de que un oficial de policía encontró drogas o armas en una PROPIEDAD que causa molestias o que un oficial trabajando de encubierto pudo comprar drogas o solicitar prostitución en la propiedad.

2. ¿Quién puede entablar una demanda bajo este estatuto?

Además de la Oficina del Fiscal General, los grupos comunitarios también pueden entablar una demanda bajo La Ley de Mitigación de Molestias Relacionadas con Drogas, Armas de Fuego o Prostitución.

§ 42-3101 (2) “Organizaciones Comunitarias” significa cualquier grupo, ya sea incorporado o sin incorporar, afiliado u organizado para el beneficio de una o más comunidades o vecindarios, de límites geográficos definidos, afectados por las molestias relacionadas con drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución, o cualquier grupo organizado en beneficio de la calidad de vida en un área residencial donde están los alegados problemas de drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución.

Se requiere por lo menos un testigo local: Para cualquier queja de los miembros de la comunidad, la organización necesita al menos un residente que:

  • Viva a menos de 3,000 pies de la propiedad que causa molestias y
  • Esté dispuesto a firmar un affidávit (declaración jurada) acerca del problema de drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución y su impacto negativo en la comunidad.

§ 42-3103(c) Cuando se interponga una acción de conformidad con este capítulo por una organización comunitaria, la queja debe estar avalada por al menos 1 persona que resida, ya sea como inquilino o de otra forma, o que sea el propietario de un inmueble dentro de 3,000 pies de la presunta propiedad que es una molestia de drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución. Dicho aval debe ser en la forma de una declaración jurada, donde se testifique el hecho de que la residencia del declarante está dentro de los 3,000 pies de la presunta molestia relacionada con drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución, que el declarante ha sido testigo de las actividades que se presume están relacionadas con problemas de drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución y de que el declarante está consciente del impacto negativo en la comunidad derivado de la presunta molestia relacionada con drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución.

3. Notificación requerida antes de la acción judicial

El Código de D.C. § 42-310 3(b) requiere que el posible demandante notifique al propietario de la molestia antes de presentar una queja.

D.C. Código D.C. § 42-310 3(b): Ninguna queja puede ser presentada a menos que se haya hecho un intento razonable de notificar al propietario del inmueble en el cual suceden las alegadas molestias relacionadas con drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución a más tardar 14 días antes de presentar la demanda. Este requisito de notificación puede ser cumplido enviando una carta a la última dirección postal conocida del propietario o publicando un aviso visible en la propiedad que indique la naturaleza general del problema relacionado con drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución.

4. Impacto negativo

La Ley de Molestias Relacionadas con Drogas, Armas de Fuego o Prostitución requiere que la queja muestre un “impacto negativo” en el área donde está ubicado el problema relacionado con drogas, armas de fuego o prostitución. El estatuto lista todas las condiciones que pueden ser definidas como impacto negativo.

§ 42-310 (1) “Impacto negativo” significa la presencia de una o más de las siguientes condiciones:

(A) Disminución del valor del inmueble que está relacionado con la prostitución, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o el uso, venta o fabricación de sustancias controladas o parafernalia relacionada con las drogas en o cerca de la propiedad;

(B) Aumento de temor de los residentes de caminar por o en áreas públicas incluyendo aceras, calles y parques, debido a la prostitución, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o el uso, venta o fabricación de sustancias controladas o parafernalia relacionada con las drogas o violencia que surge de los mismos;

(C) Incremento del volumen de tráfico vehicular y peatonal desde y hacia la propiedad que está relacionada con la prostitución, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o el uso, venta o fabricación de sustancias controladas o parafernalia de drogas en o cerca de la propiedad;

(D) Incremento del número de llamadas a ambulancias o a la policía a la propiedad que está relacionada con la prostitución, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o el uso, venta o fabricación de sustancias controladas o parafernalia relacionada con las drogas o violencia que surge de los mismos;

(E) Molestas solicitudes o propuestas de personas que desean prostituirse o vender sustancias controladas o parafernalia relacionada con las drogas en o cerca de la propiedad;

(F) La presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego en o cerca de la propiedad;

(G) Compras de sustancias controladas para investigar o parafernalia relacionada a las drogas, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o acciones de investigación relacionadas a la prostitución por oficiales de la ley encubiertos en o cerca de la propiedad;

(H) Arrestos de personas en o cerca de la propiedad debido a conducta criminal relacionada a la prostitución, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o el uso, venta o la fabricación de sustancias controladas, o parafernalia relacionadas con las drogas;

(I) Órdenes de allanamiento presentadas o ejecutadas en la propiedad relacionadas con la prostitución, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o el uso, venta o fabricación de sustancias controladas o parafernalia relacionadas con las drogas;

(J) Un considerable número de quejas presentadas a las autoridades del orden y otros oficiales del gobierno acerca de presuntas actividades ilegales asociadas con la prostitución, la presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego o el uso, venta o fabricación de sustancias controladas o parafernalia relacionadas a las drogas en o cerca de la propiedad; o

(K) La presencia, uso o exhibición de armas de fuego en la propiedad.

Si sabe de una propiedad que se ajusta a la definición de Molestias Relacionadas con las Drogas, Armas de Fuego o Prostitución bajo esta ley y ya han sido reportadas algunas actividades ilegales de manera apropiada al Departamento de Policía Metropolitana, por favor, contacte a la Oficina del Fiscal General en el Departamento de Vivienda y Justicia Comunitaria.

Althea Geletka
althea.geletka@dc.gov
(202) 727-4904

Cullen Hamilton
cullen.hamilton@dc.gov
(202) 724-6595